Unschooling is a True Legacy – Legacy

Unschooling is a True Legacy for Future Generations.

Unschooling could be the answer to the education problems we have in our country.  It won’t be an immediate solution.  If parents get involved in educating their children, they can provide a better education than sending their child to school with twenty to thirty other children their age and one teacher to teach them all.  Some arguments against unschooling are that parents don’t have the time to work with their children.  There was a time when raising a family was the most important thing you could do.  Earning a living was important because it provided for your children.  Today how much money you earn and your job status are more important than teaching and being with your children.  Parents might ask themselves, “Do I work to live or do I live to work?”   

Arguments against unschooling have been raised that children need to learn social skills by being with others their age in school.  It is true that social skills can be learned in school, but some of the things learned are not helpful.  Learning to be the victim of bullying happens in school because there may not be enough adults around who are aware of what is happening.  Learning how to swear and tell off color stories happens in school.  Learning to use drugs, alcohol and tobacco happens from socializing at school.  Learning how to deal with people of many different ages doesn’t happen in school.  In school you learn to be very competitive and to be better than everyone else.  In some classrooms children learn that if one child misbehaves the whole class will be punished.  There are few opportunities to learn to work together as a team to accomplish a goal.  You learn to sit quietly and to please the teacher.  If a child is too active, the label “attention deficit disorder” is put on the child; and drugs such as Ritalin are prescribed.    

With computers making access to knowledge readily available to any one, unlearning can be a very real way to get an education.  It has been argued that children won’t want to learn-that they will just want to do fun things.  Example, though, is a powerful teacher.  If a child is read to, they will want to learn to read for themselves.  If they see someone painting, they will want to try painting.  If they see someone using a tool to make something, they will want to try to use the tool and make something.  By exposing children to many different things, they will want to try the things that interest them.  As adults we still learn many new things just because we saw someone doing something and wanted to learn more about it.  

There are emotional blocks that prevent someone from learning and from remembering what has been learned.  Tests are very stressful times for children when they have to prove they have learned something.  Schools generate a lot of stress on children.  First they separate the child from the parents.  Then they add in social interactions that are not necessarily being supervised by adults.  Then there is the stress of competition.  And then there is the stress of proving they have learned something.  Then we wonder why depression and suicide rates are skyrocketing among our children.

Some education is best in groups.  Learning to play a musical instrument is enhanced by playing in a band or an orchestra.  Learning to play football, basketball or baseball is learned in a playing on a team.  Unschooling doesn’t mean never learning in a classroom setting or in a group.  Unschooling means learning in the best way for the individual child and at the pace that the child wants to learn.  When I was in Junior High School, I remember hearing of a concept where education would be at the individual student’s pace.  Some twelve year olds may be ready to learn High School Algebra or Geometry or even Calculus.  Other twelve year olds may need to review their times tables or get the concept of fractions or percentages figured out.  In traditional schooling some students will be bored because they already know what is being taught while other students will be lost and unable to follow and understand what is being taught.  Unschooling could allow a child to learn at the level they are at.  Unschooling could eliminate the competition to be better than everyone else, instead focusing on being better than you were before.

A good, law-abiding parent may send their child to school every day to get an education.  They may read to their child, help them with homework and try to help their child succeed in school.  Yet they may not see their child obtain a diploma because they can’t pass one of the proficiency tests or because they didn’t pass a required class.  Worse yet they may see their child choose drugs or alcohol or hanging out with friends over learning and improving their lives.

Unschooling is not likely to become the way of schooling for everyone in the near future as it involves so much from the parents.  Parents today are not prepared to be so involved with their children.  Our tax system is set up to support traditional public education, leaving parents will fewer resources for alternative education.  The parents who are ready for unschooling, for home schooling , or for active involvement in their children’s education will see their children be happier and more successful than they would have been with the traditional school system.  It is great to see some alternative ways to educate our children.  I believe unschooling will leave a great legacy for future generations.Unschooling is a True Legacy for Future Generations

Unschooling could be the answer to the education problems we have in our country.  It won’t be an immediate solution.  If parents get involved in educating their children, they can provide a better education than sending their child to school with twenty to thirty other children their age and one teacher to teach them all.  Some arguments against unschooling are that parents don’t have the time to work with their children.  There was a time when raising a family was the most important thing you could do.  Earning a living was important because it provided for your children.  Today how much money you earn and your job status are more important than teaching and being with your children.  Parents might ask themselves, “Do I work to live or do I live to work?”   

Arguments against unschooling have been raised that children need to learn social skills by being with others their age in school.  It is true that social skills can be learned in school, but some of the things learned are not helpful.  Learning to be the victim of bullying happens in school because there may not be enough adults around who are aware of what is happening.  Learning how to swear and tell off color stories happens in school.  Learning to use drugs, alcohol and tobacco happens from socializing at school.  Learning how to deal with people of many different ages doesn’t happen in school.  In school you learn to be very competitive and to be better than everyone else.  In some classrooms children learn that if one child misbehaves the whole class will be punished.  There are few opportunities to learn to work together as a team to accomplish a goal.  You learn to sit quietly and to please the teacher.  If a child is too active, the label “attention deficit disorder” is put on the child; and drugs such as Ritalin are prescribed.    

With computers making access to knowledge readily available to any one, unlearning can be a very real way to get an education.  It has been argued that children won’t want to learn-that they will just want to do fun things.  Example, though, is a powerful teacher.  If a child is read to, they will want to learn to read for themselves.  If they see someone painting, they will want to try painting.  If they see someone using a tool to make something, they will want to try to use the tool and make something.  By exposing children to many different things, they will want to try the things that interest them.  As adults we still learn many new things just because we saw someone doing something and wanted to learn more about it.  

There are emotional blocks that prevent someone from learning and from remembering what has been learned.  Tests are very stressful times for children when they have to prove they have learned something.  Schools generate a lot of stress on children.  First they separate the child from the parents.  Then they add in social interactions that are not necessarily being supervised by adults.  Then there is the stress of competition.  And then there is the stress of proving they have learned something.  Then we wonder why depression and suicide rates are skyrocketing among our children.

Some education is best in groups.  Learning to play a musical instrument is enhanced by playing in a band or an orchestra.  Learning to play football, basketball or baseball is learned in a playing on a team.  Unschooling doesn’t mean never learning in a classroom setting or in a group.  Unschooling means learning in the best way for the individual child and at the pace that the child wants to learn.  When I was in Junior High School, I remember hearing of a concept where education would be at the individual student’s pace.  Some twelve year olds may be ready to learn High School Algebra or Geometry or even Calculus.  Other twelve year olds may need to review their times tables or get the concept of fractions or percentages figured out.  In traditional schooling some students will be bored because they already know what is being taught while other students will be lost and unable to follow and understand what is being taught.  Unschooling could allow a child to learn at the level they are at.  Unschooling could eliminate the competition to be better than everyone else, instead focusing on being better than you were before.

A good, law-abiding parent may send their child to school every day to get an education.  They may read to their child, help them with homework and try to help their child succeed in school.  Yet they may not see their child obtain a diploma because they can’t pass one of the proficiency tests or because they didn’t pass a required class.  Worse yet they may see their child choose drugs or alcohol or hanging out with friends over learning and improving their lives.

Unschooling is not likely to become the way of schooling for everyone in the near future as it involves so much from the parents.  Parents today are not prepared to be so involved with their children.  Our tax system is set up to support traditional public education, leaving parents will fewer resources for alternative education.  The parents who are ready for unschooling, for home schooling , or for active involvement in their children’s education will see their children be happier and more successful than they would have been with the traditional school system.  It is great to see some alternative ways to educate our children.  I believe unschooling will leave a great legacy for future generations.