Tips for Taking the Ca Bar Exam

The Bar Exam is too important to be taken too seriously

Oscar Wilde once said: Life is too important to be taken seriously. He is on to something.

Everyone who is studying for the bar exam, of course wants to pass. After all, if the goal is not to pass, then what is the reason for all of the prep work? But in doing all of the prep work, it is best to take a day-by-day approach.

For example, do not wake up every morning and say to yourself, I just have to pass! I just have to pass! Such an attitude will create too much stress and create a sense of being overwhelmed. Though it will sound counter-intuitive, the best thing to do is not focus on the ultimate goal of passing.

Let me explain. Before I enrolled in law school, I was a sales trainer for a life insurance company. What I learned from all of the great salespeople I had met along the way, was that the salespeople who were the most successful were only concerned with their daily goal, not their year-end goal. Never would they say, I just have to produce 3 million in sales this year! Instead, they would say, I have to call 10 people before lunch, 10 people after lunch, and I need to meet Mr. and Mrs. Jones for dinner tonight.

Never did these successful salespeople focus on their year-end goal; they only focused on their daily goals. And that is how you should approach the bar review process.

Here is an example of how to set daily goals: Do 50 Emanuel Evidence MBEs in the morning and correct them before lunch; write 2 Evidence essays in the afternoon; read through the Evidence Issue Commentaries and the Suggested Answers in the evening.

When I asked these successful salespeople about their approach to sales success, the response was universal: If you achieve all of your daily goals, the year-end goal automatically happens.

Focus only on your daily goals and stay focused each day leading to the bar exam. Allow yourself to get into a routine when preparing for your exam and when the day comes, taking the exam will take less effort.

Stop saying to yourself, I have to pass! I have to pass! I have to pass! Instead, say: Today, I have to do 50 Emanuel Evidence MBEs and I have to write 2 Barperfect Evidence essays and I have to . . .