Songs and Activities for Winter

“My, it’s a cold winter day, isn’t it?”  Greetings like this help preschoolers associate what is going on outdoors with the winter songs and activities you will be doing indoors!

Activity 1 – Snowflake song
(To the tune of “Are You Sleeping?”)

I can see them, I can see them,
Floating down, floating down,
Lots of tiny snowflakes,
Lots of tiny snowflakes,
Floating down, to the ground.

I can see them, I can see them,
Blown around, blown around,
Lots of tiny snowflakes,
Lots of tiny snowflakes,
Blown around, to the ground.

When they are familiar with the song above, have children act it out by pretending to be snowflakes.  During the first stanza, they will tiptoe around and slowly move their arms before they settle gently to the floor like snowflakes.  With the second stanza, children will move about quickly, waving their arms, as if blown by the wind.  Afterwards, have them “land” on the floor.

Activity 2 – Snowflake shapes
Cut a few dozen large shapes out of white paper – triangles, diamonds and/or circles. Give each student a good mixture of different shapes and ask them to paste them on a piece of craft paper to make a big snowflake.  Show them your own completed snowflake and point to various shapes within.  This helps see how snowflakes can be designed with individual shapes of paper glued together.

Post your example where it can be seen, but encourage children to design their own snowflake the way they choose.  Some will try to copy yours while others will be more creative, and that’s okay.  When they are finished, add a faint line of glue around the edges of their snowflake and have them sprinkle glitter on the glue.  

Next, transfer their snowflakes to a winter bulletin board or tape them around the wall.  You may even wish to hang them with invisible thread or fishing line from the ceiling so they can blow and dance around overhead. (Be sure the name of each child is written on his or her project so they aren’t mixed up.)

Activity 3 – Bundle up song
(To the tune of “She’ll Be Comin’ Around the Mountain”)

When it’s winter, we wear warm coats and our hats!
When it’s winter, we wear warm coats and our hats!
When it’s freezing cold in winter, when it’s freezing cold in winter,
When it’s winter, we wear warm coats and our hats!

When it’s winter, we wear mittens and warm boots!
When it’s winter, we wear mittens and warm boots!
When it’s freezing cold in winter, when it’s freezing cold in winter,
When it’s winter we wear mittens and warm boots!

Activty 4 – Dress the snowman

Using the average height of your students as a guide, draw the shape of a snowman on sturdy cardboard.  Cut it out and spray paint it white, then allow it to thoroughly dry.  Use marker to draw eyes, nose and mouth.  Draw buttons on its chest if you wish.

Have on hand a box of items for children to dress the snowman.  Include hats, scarves, mittens or gloves, a sweater, etc.  You can also place boots beneath or in front of the snowman.  While the children work, you or your assistant can hold the figure upright.  It can also stand on its own with a sturdy support.  The following suggestion is not expensive and can be adapted if you choose:

Using a tall box (or two smaller boxes stacked), fill them with books so they won’t scoot around.  Next, use a strong glue to attach a shoebox or block of Styrofoam to each box facing outward toward the school room.  Now apply glue to the snowman’s back and attach it to the Styrofoam block or shoebox. This gives your snowman a 3-D effect and makes it easier for children to dress. 

Activity 5 – Winter weather chart
On white poster board, use vertical lines to divide the board into five or six equal sections. In each section, draw something related to winter weather – clouds, a sun, snowflakes, wind (swirly lines), rain or sleet and ice.

Each day, discuss the winter weather and ask someone to come up and point out what is happening outside.  Is it sunny?  Windy?  Cloudy and snowing?  Is there ice or snow on the ground?  If it is partly cloudy with the sun peeking through, point to both the sun and the clouds.   If it is snowing, cloudy and windy, point to all three!

You can also make smaller, individual copies of this weather chart for students and allow them to decorate it with cotton puff clouds, crayon-blue skies, a bright yellow sun, glitter for ice, snowflake stickers, etc.  Send weather charts home with students at the end of the season.    

Preschoolers are naturally curious, and they learn quickly.  As they participate in seasonal songs and activities, they gain information that stays with them the rest of their lives.  Make their winter lessons enjoyable!