Do Survey Courses or Specialized Electives look better to Colleges

College Application Made Easier

First things first, unless you’re extremely wealthy, or your parents are, the FAFSA will be your best friend. Go to www.fafsa.gov and apply for a PIN number. Once you receive your PIN (a hard copy will be mailed to you upon request), put this in a folder as you will need it for the next 4+ years every time you visit the site. Before filling out the FAFSA try to think of any and every college you may want to attend. Wherever you decide to apply, the college will need access to your FAFSA. When you fill it out add every conceivable school you have a remote chance of attending and they will automatically receive your information. Have you and/or your parents personal and tax information (from the previous year) on hand January 1 when you fill out and submit your FAFSA and yes, you want to do it early on January 1 because with financial aid it’s the “first come, first serve” method. Also as soon as you and/or your parents receive W2’s copy them twice (one to keep and one just in case you get “flagged for verification”) and if you do get flagged at a school, just go to their financial aid page, print the verification form, fill it out, attach the copy of W2’s and send it in ASAP.
Once FAFSA figures your EFC (estimated family contribution) you will receive your SAR (student aid report) print it and add to your folder. Your grant awards are based on your EFC. If it’s zero then you will receive all grants in full. Just remember the higher the EFC number, the less money the government is going to give you to attend college.
Most colleges have an application fee, but some don’t if you apply online, (Bluefield College in VA does not charge a fee if you apply online.
Most colleges have SAT standards. Pay the extra money for the SAT practice book and tests and study and take several timed practice tests. Also when filling out the preliminary paperwork, add every school you can think of, this will save time later. It’s important to know that when you get your SAT scores, DO NOT count the essay. Colleges do not count the essay. It’s used as for English placement purposes only. Only count your math and verbal scores. If you’re planning to attend a four-year institution you want a minimum of 1040 (520 on each part) and if you don’t want to take an English prep course you want a minimum of 520 on the essay. If you don’t do well, don’t panic. Sign up to take the SAT again.
Before filling out college applications make sure you have your and your parents’ information handy. Also know your overall GPA, class rank, SAT scores (just the math and verbal), clubs, sports, activities, awards, etc.
A bit of information that colleges won’t tell you is that if you’re on “the bubble;” if your grades, class rank or SAT scores aren’t quite up to snuff according to their requirements DO NOT list a major on their application, just pick “undecided” and you’ll have a better chance of being accepted than if you put, say “physics” as your major.
Do your research, make hard copies and keep them in your folder (remember this is information you’ll need for at least four years), make sure you read the fine print and turn items in before the deadline. Good luck.

College Application Made Easier

First things first, unless you’re extremely wealthy, or your parents are, the FAFSA will be your best friend. Go to www.fafsa.gov and apply for a PIN number. Once you receive your PIN (a hard copy will be mailed to you upon request), put this in a folder as you will need it for the next 4+ years every time you visit the site. Before filling out the FAFSA try to think of any and every college you may want to attend. Wherever you decide to apply, the college will need access to your FAFSA. When you fill it out add every conceivable school you have a remote chance of attending and they will automatically receive your information. Have you and/or your parents personal and tax information (from the previous year) on hand January 1 when you fill out and submit your FAFSA and yes, you want to do it early on January 1 because with financial aid it’s the “first come, first serve” method. Also as soon as you and/or your parents receive W2’s copy them twice (one to keep and one just in case you get “flagged for verification”) and if you do get flagged at a school, just go to their financial aid page, print the verification form, fill it out, attach the copy of W2’s and send it in ASAP.
Once FAFSA figures your EFC (estimated family contribution) you will receive your SAR (student aid report) print it and add to your folder. Your grant awards are based on your EFC. If it’s zero then you will receive all grants in full. Just remember the higher the EFC number, the less money the government is going to give you to attend college.
Most colleges have an application fee, but some don’t if you apply online, (Bluefield College in VA does not charge a fee if you apply online.
Most colleges have SAT standards. Pay the extra money for the SAT practice book and tests and study and take several timed practice tests. Also when filling out the preliminary paperwork, add every school you can think of, this will save time later. It’s important to know that when you get your SAT scores, DO NOT count the essay. Colleges do not count the essay. It’s used as for English placement purposes only. Only count your math and verbal scores. If you’re planning to attend a four-year institution you want a minimum of 1040 (520 on each part) and if you don’t want to take an English prep course you want a minimum of 520 on the essay. If you don’t do well, don’t panic. Sign up to take the SAT again.
Before filling out college applications make sure you have your and your parents’ information handy. Also know your overall GPA, class rank, SAT scores (just the math and verbal), clubs, sports, activities, awards, etc.
A bit of information that colleges won’t tell you is that if you’re on “the bubble;” if your grades, class rank or SAT scores aren’t quite up to snuff according to their requirements DO NOT list a major on their application, just pick “undecided” and you’ll have a better chance of being accepted than if you put, say “physics” as your major.
Do your research, make hard copies and keep them in your folder (remember this is information you’ll need for at least four years), make sure you read the fine print and turn items in before the deadline. Good luck.