Mla Citation

MLA citation is something that everyone has a problem with, regardless of age. Middle schoolers are confused by it, high schoolers think it takes too much time, college students think they’ll never use it after high school, and even teachers have a hard time remembering all the rules and regulations. While we would all love to simply close our eyes and hope the Modern Language Association allows all of this to disappear, it will never happen.

Citing sources is an important piece of any work involving research. In a country where freedom of speech is deemed a necessary freedom, plagiarism is a cardinal sin. Even if you paraphrase something, it’s always a good idea to cite the source to help save yourself from any potential back lash. While in-text citing is a must, the biggest piece that will help save you is the bibliography. There are certain aspects of your works cited page that are standardized.

* The works cited page must be on a separate sheet after your paper. You should keep the same headings, margins, and page number set up as the rest of your paper.

* While we still tend to call these pieces a bibliography, they are now labeled as “works cited.” Your title should be centered at the top of the page.

* Double space all citations, but do not skip lines between your entries.

* Only list page numbers when absolutely necessary.

The following is a short, at-a-glance guide to help you in making sure you are correctly citing your sources. Please keep in mind that not all forms of sources will be listed here. (Also, due to the formatting of this article, underlining could not be used. The author has tried to make it clear when underlining should be used in citation.)

-Book With One Author-
Author’s Last Name, First Name. Title of the Book (This is Always Underlined). City Published In: Publisher, Year.

-Book With More Than One Author-
Author A’s Last Name, First Name and Author B’s First and Last Name. Title of Book (This is Always Underlined). City Published In: Publisher, Year.

-An Edition of a Book-
Author’s Last Name, First Name. Title of the Book (This is Always Underlined). Edition. City Published In: Publisher, Year.

-Work in an Anthology/Reference/Collection-
Author’s Last Name, First Name. “Title of Essay or Article.” Title of Anthology/Reference/Collection (This is Always Underlined). Ed. Editor’s Name. City Published In: Publisher, Year. Pages.

-Multi-Volume Work-
Author’s Last Name, First Name. “Title of Essay or Article.” Title of Anthology/Reference/Collection (This is Always Underlined). Ed. Editor’s Name. Vol. #. City Published In: Publisher, Year. Pages.

-Article-
Author’s Last Name, First Name. “Title of Article.” Title of Magazine or Newspaper (This is Always Underlined). Day Month Year: pages.

-Website-
Name of Site (This is Always Underlined). Date of Posting/Revision. Name of institution/organization affiliated with the site. Date you accessed the site [URL].

-Page on a Website-
“Article Title.” Name of Site (This is Always Underlined). Date of Posting/Revision. Name of institution/organization affiliated with the site. Date you accessed the site [URL].

-Article in a Web Magazine-
Author’s Last Name, First Name. “Title of Article.” Title of Online Publication (This is Always Underlined). Date of Publication. Date you accessed the site .

It’s important to remember that this list does not cover all sources that you may use, but does cover those that are most often used in research at various levels from 6th grade up through college. While these will hopefully help you in your citation needs, please feel free to check out the following websites for additional citing.

The Owl At Perdue. 9 April 2008. The Writing Lab & The OWL at Perdue, and Perdue University. 29 July 2008 [http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/557/01].

The Write Source: Writer’s INC. 2008. Houghton Mifflin Company. 29 July 2008 [http://www.thewritesource.com/inc.html].